Four

I mentioned throughlines. I talked about the John Vorhaus book, The Comic Toolbox, here. This go around, I decided to quit groping in the dark and give every main character a throughline from the beginning.  These are subject to change. Really, they’re just a test to see if the story holds water. Here are the throughlines for Land of Enchantment.

In the present, protagonist Evangeline Walker is living in the woods. She wants safety and peace. A door opens when a journalist investigates a local Native American Tribe. She takes control by taking him to an ancient burial ground in the wilderness. A monkey wrench is thrown when he discovers her past. Things fall apart when the tribe gains control of the land because of his support. She hits bottom when they plan to build a gambling casino on the site. She risks all when she comes out of hiding to lead the opposition against it. The woman gets safety and peace.

In the past, protagonist Evangeline Walker has an abusive husband. A door opens when she kills him. She takes control when she is acquitted of murder. A monkey wrench is thrown when her family continues to blame her. Things fall apart when they have her temporarily committed to a mental institution. She hits bottom when she is drugged and given electroshock therapy. She risks all when she escapes. She gets safety and peace.

In the present, antagonist Hudson Kemper writes for the New York Times. He wants to be a historical influence as a journalist. The door opens when he is sent to New Mexico to cover a local festival. While there, he finds a better story about a local tribe’s struggle to gain control of an ancient burial ground. He takes control when he decides to write about the cause. A monkey wrench is thrown when he meets Evangeline Walker, who will lose her home if the tribe succeeds. Things fall apart when she suffers an episode of Post Tramatic Stress Disorder while guiding him through the wilderness. He hits bottom when he writes the story that furthers his career. He risks all when he quits his job. He becomes a historical influence when he writes the story truthfully.

Present day antagonist, Gideon Harrison is the leader of a modern-day Native American tribe. He wants to take care of his people and maintain his political position. The door opens when he leads a movement to gain federal property. He takes control when a reporter writes about it in the New York Times. A monkey wrench is thrown when a local woman protests. Things fall apart when a young man is killed spying on her and the reporter. He hits bottom when the tribe blames him for the death. He risks all when he goes ahead with plans to build a casino on the property. He loses everything in the end when the tribe elects a new leader.

This is a satire, loosely set in New Mexico in the wilderness areas around Santa Fe and Taos.

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