Night Shift

The words have real meaning. Two weeks on days. Two weeks on nights. Lather. Rinse. Repeat. For a family, whose breadwinner finds work in the current economy, it’s a blip–barely an inconvenience, but still an adjustment. Here are ten things I’ve figured out:

  1. The trajectory of the job search coincides with the time I’ve been writing this book, two years and eight months. I’m not finished.
  2. I can live with the new schedule. I’m more confident every day.
  3. When I lose it because I’m lonely, overwhelmed, isolated or bored, working in the garden puts my head back on my shoulders.
  4. Writing at 5:45 a.m. keeps the self-loathing away. If Bacon can handle alternating shifts, I can get up early to write.
  5. Conversely, I have to go to sleep at 10:30 every night. Otherwise, 5:45 is impossible. I may not be on his schedule, but I still have to have one.
  6. The way I used to do housework is impossible. I can’t make a bed when he’s asleep in it, and cooking dinner at three in the afternoon is just dumb. No one will eat it. The learning curve is steep on domesticity.
  7. The flip side of the night shift is quiet. The kids go to bed, and I have time to think.
  8. Weekends are wonderful. They mean something again.
  9. Steady income.
  10. Two years and eight months ago, I wanted to write a book that would make readers think about what they believe. I get to do that every day.
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